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Sunday, November 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Socinianism in seventeenth-century England found in the catalog.

Socinianism in seventeenth-century England

H. John McLachlan

Socinianism in seventeenth-century England

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  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in [London] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Socinianism,
    • Religious thought -- England

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliographical footnotes.

      Statementby H. John McLachlan.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBT1480 .M34
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 352 p.
      Number of Pages352
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6091698M
      LC Control Number51008512
      OCLC/WorldCa3297112

      ‎It is an adventure book. To discuss embryological thought in seventeenth-century England is to discuss the main currents in embryological thought at a time when those currents were both numerous and shifting. Like every other period, the seventeenth century was one of . This superb documentary collection illuminates the history of witchcraft and witch-hunting in seventeenth-century New England. The cases examined begin in , extend to the Salem outbreak in , and document for the first time the extensive Stamford-Fairfield, Connecticut, witch-hunt of . Boston: Starr King Press, Hardcover. xxvii + p., cloth boards, no dj, a few small spots to covers, else very good. :


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Socinianism in seventeenth-century England by H. John McLachlan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Socinianism in seventeenth-century England [H. John McLachlan] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Socinianism in Seventeenth-century England. Herbert John McLachlan. Oxford University Press, - England - pages. 0 Reviews. From inside the book.

What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents. THE DIssol UTIo N of HIGH calvi NIs M. Mortimer’s book stands out from its predecessors by showing the positive uses of Socinian theories on reason, natural law, and civil government in seventeenth-century England.

This provides an intriguing contribution to the historical landscape of English theology. Chapter one shows the rise and development of by: Socinianism has often been studied in national contexts and apart from other currents like Arminianism.

This volume is especially interested in the “in-betweens”: the relationship of Anti-trinitarianism to “liberal” currents in reformed Protestantism, namely Dutch Remonstrants, English Latitudinarians and some French Huguenots. Sarah Mortimer has now written a very different kind of book about the impact of Socinianism in seventeenth-century England.

Her concern is less with the growth of religious rationalism, let alone popular radicalism, and more with the development of Anglican and Royalist political thought.

Although she is naturally interested in the part. McLachlan, H. J., Socinianism in Seventeenth Century England (London, ). Mendle, M., ‘ The Ship Money Case, The Case of Shipmony and the Development of Henry Parker's Parliamentary Absolutism ’, Historical Journal 32 (), – One such form of anti-Trinitarianism theology was prominent in Sixteenth and Seventeenth century Europe was known as Socinianism.

Socinianism is based of the works of Faustus Socinus. Socinianism (/ s ə ˈ s ɪ n i ə n ɪ z əm /) is a system of Christian doctrine named for Italians Lelio Sozzini (Latin: Laelius Socinus) and Fausto Sozzini (Latin: Faustus Socinus), uncle and nephew, respectively, which was developed among the Polish Brethren in the Minor Reformed Church of Poland during the 16th and 17th centuries and embraced by the Unitarian Church of Transylvania.

It is important to note that there were few, if any, individuals in seventeenth-century England who can be identified as definitively ‘Socinian’. Nonetheless, Mortimer makes an excellent case for the prevalence of Socinian ideas, both in terms of positive Socinianism in seventeenth-century England book negative engagement, throughout the English Revolution.

After surveying the rise of Socinianism in seventeenth-century England, the article augments the known theological contexts of Bunyan's disputes with the Quakers and the Latitudinarians by showing that he charges these groups with slighting the Son and so associates them with anti-Trinitarian heresy.

Despite the significance of the disputes on the Trinity in seventeenth-century England, Socinianism in seventeenth-century England book strange lacuna regarding either the doctrine of the Trinity or the place of Socinianism within the larger intellectual history of early modern England”3 existed in historiography until recently.

For almost half a century until the s, the only. Antitrinitarians, Calvinists and Cultural Exchange in Seventeenth-Century Europe. Leiden, Boston: Brill, ix + pp. $ This book is a collection of eleven essays which were presented at the symposium Socinianism and Cultural Exchange which was organized by the editors on July at the Ludwig Maximilian University.

E-Book ISBN: Publisher: Some Roots and Ramifications of the Trinitarian Controversy in Seventeenth-Century England. Isaac Newton, Socinianism.

In discussing the impact of Socinianism I have sought to bring together politics and religion, political ideas and theology. In seventeenth-century England it was impossible to discuss one without touching upon the other, and my exploration of Socinianism shows some of the many ways in which political and religious arguments went hand in hand.

Original and thought-provoking, this collection sheds new light on an important yet understudied feature of seventeenth-century England's political and cultural landscape: exile.

Through an essentially literary lens, exile is examined both as physical departure from England-to France, Germany, the Low Countries and America-and as inner, mental. For seventeenth-century theologians, the anti-Trinitarian theology known as Socinianism was, as Willem van Asselt put it, “the very nadir of heresy.” 1 Many British and Continental divines wrote in great and earnest detail against the insidious errors of the so-called Polish Brethren and other Socinians.

by this exemplary collection of primar y sources. This book is a fine example of painstaking, dedicated scholarship and Dr. Milton is to be applauded. Martin Mulsow and Jan Rohls, eds. Socinianism and Arminianism. Antitrinitarians, Calvinists and Cultural Exchange in Seventeenth-Century Europe.

Leiden, Boston: Brill, ix + pp. $ Socinianism has often been studied in national contexts and apart from other currents like Arminianism. This volume is especially interested in the "in-betweens": the relationship of Anti-trinitarianism to "liberal" currents in reformed Protestantism, namely Dutch Remonstrants, English Latitudinarians and some French Huguenots.

This in-between also has a local aspect: the volume studies the. seventeenth century - but their books also point to the urgent need for more work on the distinctive nature of these heterodox ideas and their proponents.

Socinianism and Arminianism is a collection of essays whose origin lies in a symposium entitled 'Socinianism and cultural exchange' held in.

Late 17th century - Socinians influential in Netherlands and England, where, among other things, they inspires the development of Deism (a view more radical, because less tied to Scripture, than Socinianism).

Power and politics were two vital factors for social standards in England in the third and fourth decades of the seventeenth century. This was the beginning of struggle between the parliament and. while these books were anathematised by the orthodox, Socinian works proved popular in radical circles.

Even though the lower clergy found the prices of these volumes out of their reach, they remained in steady demand in seventeenth-century England.6 Although Socinianism is rooted in specific historical and regional. "Eighteenth-century English Socinianism is deserving of further study and the way will be illuminated by Mortimer's very fine book." Jeffrey R.

Wigelsworth, Canadian Journal of History "All students of seventeenth-century English theology, history, and politics are indebted to Sarah Mortimer for a richly contextualized account of the widespread.

[28] C. Firth and R. Rait, Acts and Ordinances of the Interregnum, –, 3 vols., London,p –6; H. McLachlan, Socinianism in Seventeenth-Century England, Oxford,p – [29] Burning at the stake remained on the statute book in England untilas the punishment for a woman who murdered her husband.

The potential role of Socinianism--its emphasis on religion supported by reason and conscious acceptance or rejection of belief--in eighteenth-century England is utterly fascinating, especially as historians continue to reveal aspects of the heresy in such Enlightenment paragons as John Locke, Isaac Newton, and the English deists.

Socinianism in England and Europe; 3. The Great Tew Circle: Socinianism and scholarship; 4. Royalists, Socinianism and the English Civil War; 5.

Socinianism and the Church of England; 6. Reason, religion and the doctrine of the Trinity; 7. Anti-trinitarianism, Socinianism and the limits of toleration; 8.

After surveying the rise of Socinianism in seventeenth-century England, the article augments the known theological contexts of Bunyan's disputes with the Quakers and the Latitudinarians by showing.

Socinianism originated in Italy as an amalgam of Valdesian Erasmianism, Florentine Platonism, Paduan Aristotelianism, and Protestant Biblicism. In Poland it was augmented and altered by specifically Calvinist and Anabaptist ingredients. Diffused in Germany, Holland, and Great Britain, it showed affinities with 17th-century philosophy.

Introduction. 1 The Trinitarian controversy in late seventeenth-century England saw the opposition between Unitarian theologians led by the heterodox clergyman Stephen Nye, who drew on Socinianism and other theological traditions in denying the Trinity, and Trinitarian divines. Some of the latter, such as William Sherlock, Robert South, John Wallis, and John Edwards, employed different.

SOCINIANISM IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND by John McLachlan, Oxfordp. " KIPPIS Biogr. Brit. /2 note" (Oxford English Dictionary) The adherents to Mr. Biddle were called Biddellians; but this name was lost in the more common appellation of Socinians, or, what they preferred, Unitarians.

Abstract. Read online. The Trinitarian controversy in late seventeenth-century England saw the confrontation of Unitarian theologians, who drew on Socinianism and other theological traditions in denying the Trinity, and Trinitarian divines, who provided different justifications of the Trinitarian dogma, mainly through metaphysical speculation.

Socinianism was a book religion both in its biblicism and erudition, as well as its steady output of Latin theological texts. Socinian works were anathematized by the orthodox, but proved popular in radical circles. While the lower clergy could not afford these volumes, they remained in constant demand in seventeenth-century England In the seventeenth century an alternative position was put forward in England by Lord Herbert of Cherbury.

He maintained that revelation was unnecessary because human reason was able to know all the truths requisite for salvation.

In this list he included three primary truths: the existence of God, the moral law, and retribution in a future life. Question: "What is Socinianism?" Answer: Socinianism is an unorthodox form of non-trinitarianism that was developed around the same time as the Protestant Reformation () by Italian humanist Lelio Sozzini and later promulgated by his cousin, Fausto Sozzini.

In modern times Socinianism has been referred to as psilanthropism, the view that Jesus was merely human (from. Book Description: Gesa Stedman's ambitious new study is a comprehensive account of cross-channel cultural exchanges between seventeenth-century France and England, and includes discussion of a wide range of sources and topics.

Literary texts, garden design, fashion, music, dance, food, the book market, and the theatre as well as key historical. (5) Stanislas Kot, Socinianism in Poland.

The Social and Political Ideas of the Polish Antitrinitarians. Translated by Earl Morse Wilbur, (Boston, ). XXII. (6) Pierre Jurieu, Protestant professor of theology at Rotterdam, cited by H. John McLachlan Socinianism in Seventeenth-Century England, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ), p.

Get this from a library. Socinianism and Arminianism: Antitrinitarians, Calvinists, and cultural exchange in seventeenth-century Europe. [Martin Mulsow; Jan Rohls;] -- "Socinianism has often been studied in national contexts and apart from other currents like Arminianism.

This volume is especially interested in the "in-betweens": the relationship of. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Socinianism was a growing concern throughout the seventeenth century, making its presence felt by the s, and becoming more vocal in the s, due in large part to the labors of John Biddle. 1 “By the end of the [s] the Socinian threat loomed large in the minds of many English divines,” according to Tim Cooper.

Socinianism and Arminianism: Antitrinitarians, Calvinists, and cultural exchange in seventeenth-century Europe / Published: () Socinianism brought to the test or Jesus Christ proved to be either the adorable God, or a notorious impostor.

_____ The Rights of War and Peace in Three Books, Socinianism and Arminianism: Antritrinitarians, Calvinists, and Cultural Exchange in Seventeenth-century Europe (Leiden, (eds), Public Duty and Private Conscience in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, ).Great Tew circle (act.

–), comprised the scholarly friends of Lucius Cary, second Viscount Falkland, who conversed and studied together at his house in the village of Great Tew in nd retired to Great Tew inhaving inherited property there a year before.

For him and his friends it was the ideal location for intellectual pursuits, being just 18 miles from Oxford.This superb documentary collection illuminates the history of witchcraft and witch-hunting in seventeenth-century New England. The cases examined begin inextend to the Salem outbreak inand document for the first time the extensive Stamford-Fairfield, Connecticut, witch-hunt of – Here one encounters witch-hunts through the eyes of those who participated in them: the.